Open Data

ABAG’s Resilience Open Data portal contains 40+ hazard map layers and a growing list of tabular data sets for the nine county Bay Area region. Local governments can perform community vulnerability analyses with the data – which can inform resilience planning efforts and policy solutions. Some of the data is collected and generated by ABAG; however, most of the data is generated by other agencies and curated here. In some instances these data sets are unchanged from their original source, in other cases, ABAG has translated the data for use by cities and counties. The associated metadata describes the source and any changes made. For questions about the data, or for help in downloading or viewing the data please email us.

Jump to data on: Natural Hazards | Assets

The icons depict if the data is GIS map layers or data tables. For more information about the data layers click “more info”.

Natural Hazards

Bay Area communities are exposed to earthquakes, floods, fires, landslides, drought, and extreme heat. This portal was updated in June 2015 with the most current layers for each hazard. In accompaniment of this page CalAdapt can be used to understand how climate change will impact flooding, fire, and drought in the future. Some of the hazard layers can be viewed on the ABAG GIS Hazard WebViewer.

Earthquake Basics (33MB) – 4 Map Layers: Alquist Priolo Fault Zones, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA), Liquefaction Susceptibility, Liquefaction Zones, Landslide Susceptibility.

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Alquist Priolo Fault Zones The layer maps all Alquist Priolo Earthquake Fault Zones in the Bay Area. This is not a list of all faults in the Bay Area, but rather those where there is known potential for surface fault rupture. The Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Act’s main purpose is to prevent the construction of buildings used for human occupancy on the surface trace of active faults. More information is included in the metadata. (CGS, 2015)

Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) This hazard layer is used to display the composite shaking hazard across the Bay Area based on all earthquake scenarios and probability information using the Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) scale. The layer shows likely shaking intensity in the Bay Area in any 50 year period from all possible faults. More information is included in the metadata. (ABAG & USGS, 2013)

Liquefaction Susceptibility This report presents a map and database of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility for the urban core of the San Francisco Bay region. More information is included in the metadata. (USGS, 2006)

Liquefaction Zones These maps are State regulatory maps that show “Zones of Required Investigation” for liquefaction (and landslide) hazard. They do not depict different degrees of hazard, rather they identify zones within which site specific studies will be required for new construction. More information is included in the metadata. (CGS, 2015)

Earthquake Scenarios – Ground Shaking (11MB) – 16 Layers: Multiple faults in the region can produce damaging shaking in the region. 16 scenarios are mapped to show how single earthquakes may shake the region.

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Scenario Earthquake Shaking These 16 shapefiles represents projected ground shaking for different earthquake scenarios. The maps were created in 2012 by USGS. The following scenarios are included in the package: M7.1 Berryessa, M6.4 Calaveras (Central), M7.0 Calaveras (All Sections), M6.8 Concord Southern Green Valley, M6.8 Great Valley (4b), M6.7 Great Valley (5), M7.0 Greenville, M6.8 Hayward (South), M7.0 Hayward (North & South), M7.4 Maacama, M6.7 Mount Diablo, M7.1 Rodgers Creek, M7.2 San Andreas (Peninsula), M7.8 San Andreas (All Northern Sections), M7.5 San Gregorio, M6.7 West Napa. More information is included in the metadata. (USGS, 2012)

Earthquake Scenarios – Scenario Liquefaction Potential (426MB) : 16 Layers: For each of the scenarios there is potential for liquefaction to occur where soils are susceptible, and where there is strong ground shaking.

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Scenario Liquefaction Potential These 16 shapefiles represents scenario liquefaction potential for different earthquake scenarios. A liquefaction potential exists when the ground is both susceptible to liquefaction (loose soil that is saturated with water) and exposed to strong enough shaking. This map combines the liquefaction susceptibility map with a single earthquake shaking scenario. The following scenarios are included in the package: M7.1 Berryessa, M6.4 Calaveras (Central), M7.0 Calaveras (All Sections), M6.8 Concord Southern Green Valley, M6.8 Great Valley (4b), M6.7 Great Valley (5), M7.0 Greenville, M6.8 Hayward (South), M7.0 Hayward (North & South), M7.4 Maacama, M6.7 Mount Diablo, M7.1 Rodgers Creek, M7.2 San Andreas (Peninsula), M7.8 San Andreas (All Northern Sections), M7.5 San Gregorio, M6.7 West Napa. More information is included in the metadata. (ABAG, 2015)

Tsunami Basics (1.4MB) – 2 Layers: Tsunami Inundation Map for Emergency Planning (State of CA), Tsunami Scenario Inundation in an Alaska Earthquake (SAFRR Study).

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Tsunami Inundation Map for Emergency Planning This tsunami inundation map was prepared to assist cities and counties in identifying their tsunami hazard. It is intended for local jurisdictional, coastal evacuation planning uses only. This map, and the information presented herein, is not a legal document and does not meet disclosure requirements for real estate transactions nor for any other regulatory purpose. More information is included in the metadata. (State of CA, 2009)

Tsunami Scenario Inundation in an Alaska Earthquake This layer shows the projected tsunami inundation for a single scenario M9.1 Alaskan earthquake. The layer only explores the inundation in select areas (areas with the greatest inundation potential). In 2013 USGS with many agencies released a SAFRR project which explored the scenario of an Alaskan produced tsunami’s impact on California. More information is included in the metadata. (USGS & CGS, 2013)

Flood – 100 & 500 year (35MB) – 1 Layer: FEMA Flood Furcated. Data for all Bay Area counties except for San Francisco were obtained March 16th, 2015 by ABAG.

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Flood – 100 & 500 year The shapefile maps flooding layers (100-year and 500-year floodplain) for the 9 county Bay Area region (County of San Francisco is missing). This should not be used for flood insurance purposes, but rather hazard mapping. More information is included in the metadata. (FEMA, 2015)

Sea Level Rise (271MB) – 1 Layer: Sea Level Rise (0 to 6 feet) The data shows potential sea level rise inundation ranging from 1 to 6 feet above current Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) for the region.

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Sea Level Rise (0 to 6 feet) This data was created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center’s efforts to create an online mapping viewer depicting potential sea level rise and its associated impacts on the nation’s coastal areas. The purpose of the mapping viewer is to provide coastal managers and scientists with a preliminary look at sea level rise (slr) and coastal flooding impacts. More information is included in the metadata. (NOAA, 2012)

Landslide Basics (32MB) – 2 Layers: Earthquake-Induced Landslides, Rainfall-Induced Landslides. Landslides are often triggered by earthquake shaking or by very saturated soils.

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Earthquake Induced Landslides Seismic Hazard Zones are regulatory zones that encompass areas prone to liquefaction (failure of water-saturated soil) and earthquake-induced landslides. What does it mean to be located within a Seismic Hazard Zone? It means that the state has determined that there is likely that weak soil and/or rock may be present beneath the property. If present, these weak materials can fail during an earthquake and, unless proper precautions are taken during grading and construction, can cause damage to structures. in the Bay Area, the state has only mapped portions of San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Alameda Counties. More information is included in the metadata. (CGS, 2015)

Rainfall Induced Landslides The distribution of landslides evident in the landscape — most of which are slumps, translational slides, and earth flows — is of interest both for evaluation of hazard and risk and for use in further study of landslides. Future movement of such landslides is most likely to occur within and around the places where they have previously occurred. More information is included in the metadata (USGS, 1997)

Fire Basics (27MB) – 5 Layers: Fire Responsibility Areas, Fire Hazard Severity in State Responsible Areas, Very High Fire Hazard Severity in Local Responsible Areas, Historic Fire Perimeters, and Wildland Urban Interfaces.

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Fire Responsibility Areas CAL FIRE has a legal responsibility to provide fire protection on all State Responsibility Area (SRA) lands, which are defined based on land ownership, population density and land use. For example, CAL FIRE does not have responsibility for densely populated areas, incorporated cities, agricultural lands, or lands administered by the federal government. The SRA dataset provides areas of legal responsibility for fire protection, including State Responsibility Areas (SRA), Federal Responsibility Areas (FRA), and Local Responsibility Areas (LRA). More information is included in the metadata. (Cal Fire, 2014)

Fire Hazard Severity in State Responsible Areas The goal of this mapping effort is to create more accurate fire hazard zone designations such that mitigation strategies are implemented in areas where hazards warrant these investments. The fire hazard zones will provide specific designation for application of defensible space and building standards consistent with known mechanisms of fire risk to people, property, and natural resources. This dataset provides zones in SRA, as adopted by CAL FIRE on November 7, 2007. More information is included in the metadata. (Cal Fire, 2007)

Very High Fire Hazard Severity in Local Responsible Areas Updates to the California Building Code Chapter 7A required new buildings in Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones to use ignition resistant construction methods and materials. These new codes include provisions to improve the ignition resistance of buildings, especially from firebrands. The updated very high fire hazard severity zones will be used by building officials for new building permits in Local Responsibility Area. More information is included in the metadata. (Cal Fire, 2008)

Historic Fire Perimeters CAL FIRE with other agencies jointly maintains a comprehensive fire perimeter GIS layer for public and private lands throughout the state. The data covers fires back to 1878. The data provides a reasonable view of the spatial distribution of past large fires. More information is included in the metadata. (Cal Fire, 2014)

Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) CAL FIRE produced a statewide map to flag areas that could be considered WUI zones. The designation is dependent upon two data sets, U.S. Census Bureau (2000) Housing Unit density* and USGS National Land Cover Data (NLCD). This data should be scrutinized by local information as the data sets may inappropriately rank density or land cover. This data is in raster format and is accompanied by a .txt metadata file.

Drought, May 2015 (1MB) – 1 Layer: The map shows the levels of drought in California as of May 05, 2015. The US Drought Monitor updates weekly drought maps that can be downloaded from the Drought Monitor website. More information is included in the metadata. (USDM, 2015)

Assets

Risk assessment requires both an understanding of the hazards as well as the assets we’re trying to protect. Most of this information is aggregated and stored at the city or county level. ABAG has a few resources taken from the state and federal level that can be used in congruence with local information and knowledge.

Community Vulnerability Indicators (17MB) – 2 Layers: Community Vulnerability Indicators, Indicators Mask Updated!

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Community Vulnerability Indicators Represents Community Vulnerability Indicators identified by ABAG and BCDC for the Housing and Community Multiple Hazard Risk Assessment project, 2014. Indicators include age (elderly, young), language, race, cost burdened (housing, transportation), education, transit dependence, home ownership. For more information, please visit the online report.

Indicators Mask This layer was produced to mask out portions of census block groups that did not have any residential land use within them (for example, open space, schools, etc.). This layer is created with regional level data. If a local jurisdiction chooses to mask the Community Indicators.lpk they may choose to mask using a more refined/granular local data.

Hospitals (1MB) – 1 Table, 1 Layer: A geographic layer with all acute care facilities in California that are subject to Senate Bill 1953 requiring their seismic retrofit. The table adds granular information for each facility, listing the seismic status of each building that comprises the acute care facility.

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Hospitals (GIS Layer) The data set shows the location of hospital campuses/facilities, but does not directly reference their current structural (SPC) and non-structural (NPC) values. SPC and NPC values are given to hospital components (i.e. Wing A, Wing B, Building X) but not for an entire facility (except when the facility is only one standalone structure – rare). Individual component SPC and NPC values can be found in a database folder. (OSHPD, 2015)

Hospitals (Excel Table) There are 3 sheets in this data set, which provide information on the OSHPD seismic rating of individual structures that comprise hospital facilities. Most hospitals are comprised of multiple buildings, and building wings. The seismic rating of hospitals is granular – providing ratings for each building component of a hospital. (OSHPD, 2015 – simplified by ABAG)

Disclaimer

The information provided is intended for planning use only and is not intended to be site-specific. Rather, it depicts general risk within neighborhoods and the relative risks from community to community. Hazard levels are less likely to be accurate if your neighborhood is on, or near, the border between zones. The information in this map application is not a substitute for a site-specific investigation by a licensed professional. For non-planning purposes use data and maps provided directly from the source agencies.

Last updated: 10.26.2016